Category: Resources

  • World’s oceans badly damaged

    Only about 4% of the world’s oceans remain undamaged by human activity, according to the first detailed global map of human impacts on the seas. A study in Science says climate change, fishing, pollution and other human factors have exacted a heavy toll on almost half of the marine waters. Only remote icy areas near…

  • Cheney accused of blocking Californian bid to cut car fumes

    The US vice-president, Dick Cheney, was behind a controversial decision to block California’s attempt to impose tough emission limits on car manufacturers, according to insiders at the government Environmental Protection Agency. Staff at the agency, which announced last week that California’s proposed limits were redundant, said the agency’s chief went against their expert advice after…

  • Laying Waste to the Deep Sea

    Far out on the high seas, on any given day, hundreds of fishing vessels drag huge nets, big enough to snag a 747 jumbo jet, across the ocean bottom, vacuuming up 150-year-old fish, flattening ancient reefs and destroying everything else in their paths. TIME Magazine’s Ken Stiers writes: Only the biodiversity of tropical rainforests rivals…

  • US shifts $16 blllion toward renewable energy

    There’s some hope out there. The U.S. House of Representatives on Saturday passed a Democratic rewrite of U.S. energy policy that strips $16 billion in tax incentives away from Big Oil and puts it toward renewable energy sources like wind and solar power. The 786-page bill, passed in a rare Saturday vote, was a top…

  • Sigbritt, 75, has world’s fastest broadband

    A 75 year old woman from Karlstad in central Sweden has been thrust into the IT history books — with the world’s fastest internet connection. Sigbritt Löthberg’s home has been supplied with a blistering 40 Gigabits per second connection, many thousands of times faster than the average residential link and the first time ever that…

  • Australia plans climate ‘spine’ for wildlife

    Australia will create a wildlife corridor spanning the continent to allow animals and plants to flee the effects of global warming. The 2,800-kilometer (1,740 mile) climate “spine,” approved by state and national governments, will link the country’s entire east coast, from the snow-capped Australian alps in the south to the tropical north — the distance…

  • Wild Earth No More?

    According to National Geographic, soon there will be no “road less traveled” to take. As of 1995 only 17 percent of Earth’s land remained free of direct human influence, as seen in this map of the vast networks of shipping lanes and roads that crisscross the planet. In the rush to stock food supplies, keep…

  • Plastic duck armada is heading for Britain after 15-year global voyage

    A flotilla of plastic ducks is heading for Britain’s beaches, according to an American oceanographer. For the past 15 years Curtis Ebbesmeyer has been tracking nearly 30,000 plastic bath toys that were released into the Pacific Ocean when a container was washed off a cargo ship.

  • Age of Grand Canyon a Bush secret

    Grand Canyon National Park is not permitted to give an official estimate of the geologic age of its principal feature, due to pressure from Bush administration appointees. Despite promising a prompt review of its approval for a book claiming the Grand Canyon was created by Noah’s flood rather than by geologic forces, more than three…

  • Bogus data masks China’s pollution woes

    Soaring pollution levels in China may be even worse than thought because local governments bent on economic growth are lying about their progress in meeting environmental goals. Data reported by China’s regional governments indicates a national goal to reduce China’s two main pollutants by two percent in 2006 has been reached, but calculations by the…